Followers

09 July 2014

New finish (with which I am not pleased)



This is "Are You My Mother" by Bent Creek.  I stitched it on a piece of Jobelan I had around, with most of the DMC conversion. I did sub out the 550 the chart called for for the flower for 3041, since that looked more like the color of the Weeks they used. But the chick, because that's a chick, not a grown bird, the colors they chose were awful. I only tweaked it a little, because I couldn't figure out the golds to convert the chick to, but knew I didn't want a dark beak, so the beak and legs are 3822.

And . . . imagine my non-delighted surprise to find out that the two skeins of 936 I used for the stem (because I misplaced one while tidying up) were not a similar dyelot. One is an olive-y green, the other is not. What is up with that, DMC?

I know these are things most people wouldn't care about, and it's cute. If it wasn't that I know what it was supposed to look like, I wouldn't even care, but the colors for the chick that were the company's conversion look NOTHING like the picture on the package, and that is not a dyelot issue. That is just a poor conversion on the part of the designer.

I've said it before, I'll say it again. Is it so hard to check your conversion before you release a design? Or even have it stitched in the DMC you converted it to? I usually stitch in DMC because of the affordability of it, and, to some extent, because it can be washed if my assistant has messy hands and a joyous interest.  Kind of sucky if I can't trust what's on the chart will give me a finish that looks similar (and I know, I know, if it shows overdyeds, using a regular thread doesn't give the same effect, but could it at least be in the ballpark?). Brittercup conversions are usually pretty spot-on, that is why I want to do the quilt I have envisioned with her designs. I have at least one other BC kitted up with regular floss and am now going to go over it and make sure I like how it looks.

Oh, well, onward and upward.

7 comments:

riona said...

That's a darn shame. But still, the piece is rather pretty as you stitched it. No one else is going to see anything amiss. Only you know that your expectations weren't met. I haven't stitched a Bent Creek chart in decades ... are they usually this careless?

Stitchinowl said...

Very pretty finish. Still, I feel your pain! I have been often annoyed with poor DMC conversions on charts, that look nothing like the hand-dyed color.
Carolyn

Robin said...

I like your finish, Rachel. If you had not said anything about the chick, I wouldn't have known. But you are right about DMC conversions lacking at times.

Robin in Virginia

Blu said...

It's very pretty, but I hear you on incorrect conversions. They can sometimes be awful and what other stitchers come up with is usually wonderful. But they shouldn't have to! If it's a purchased pattern then the people in charge should have done their best to make it a good one. Sloppy jobs like this make me so wary of buying from the designer again.

Carol said...

I get frustrated by some of the DMC conversions, too, Rachel, so I know just what you're feeling... In spite of that, you really have an adorable finish there!

Bonnie said...

I done one of the Easter designs that looked so fall like I was not happy with also. The conversions on the Homespun Elegance charts are also so terrible. Now I check the conversions before I stitch to much. I also generally use DMC.

Shebafudge said...

Sorry you aren't happy with your finish. I get what you are saying about the conversions, it seems to be a bit of a corner cutting issue as much as anything I think. The designer probably doesn't actually pull the threads and check they work but relies on the online conversion chart (or wherever they got it from). On the other hand, your finish is really cute. xx

I do my thing and you do yours. I am not in this world to live up to your expectations, and you are not in this world to live up to mine. You are you and I am I, and if by chance we find each other, then it is beautiful. If not, it can’t be helped--Frederick Perls